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Advice Entrepreneurship India Startups Venture Capital

10 Things to Consider Before Approaching a VC

A lot of very very smart, experienced investors have put similar information out there over the last few years. If you’ve read it before, consider this a reminder. If you haven’t read it before then consider this a starting point. This post shouldn’t be seen as a comprehensive list. It’s more of a response to various pitches I’ve been getting from multiple sources over the last month.

“Understand the investor’s mandate, fund size, investment reqs. Pitch the right investors and build releationships with others” – TJ Sassani, Founder of Zozi.

  • Research

  • Before going out and trying to approach investors, take the time to create a spreadsheet of the various investors you want to approach. This will be your scrappy CRM for managing your investor pipeline. Some of the columns in your spreadsheet could be:

    1. Why you want them to be investors
    2. Can you get an intro to the investor from someone that the investor knows and trusts
    3. Have they invested in your market in the past
    4. At what stage do they typically make investments
    5. What is the fund size
    6. What is their typical check size
    7. What criteria do they use in determining if you’re a fit for them

    Once you’ve built this matrix (and customized it according to your needs), filter out the investors who don’t invest in your market or don’t invest at the stage you are at. Then look at the other criteria and keep filtering. Once you’re down to a list of investors that have an investment thesis that your company would fit into, begin your approach. You may want to consider speaking with the investor that is least likely to invest in your company first. Pitch them and get feedback. Incorporate that feedback into your pitch. Become awesome (if you aren’t already) at your pitch each time you pitch someone new and move up the ladder. The investor you want most to be in your current round should be the last one that you pitch to so that you’ve received enough feedback to make your pitch really awesome.

  • Connecting with Other Founders

  • This is something that you should consider doing as part of your research. Try to connect with founders that have raised money from some of the VCs in your pipeline. Connect with them, meet with them if possible and discuss very specific questions that will give you some insight into the VC and if there is a fit with you, your company, the stage at which your company is at, specifics that you would like the VC to help with and what the VC can help with. Finding what companies a VC has invested in is usually not that difficult. A good place to start for recent investments is AngelList.

  • Understanding a VCs Motivation and Economics

  • VCs typically invest in many many companies. Out of the investments they make, the majority don’t yield positive outcomes (check out this report by the Kauffman Foundation). Hence, most VCs need to invest in companies that are going after large opportunies, have balanced teams, focus on execution and have a higher probability of a large positive outcome to help offset some of their losses. There are many reports/blogs/articles and books that talk about the economics behind VC funds and I would urge founders to read as many of these as possible before approaching VCs. If you haven’t read this post by Mark Suster yet, you should.

  • Market Opportunity

  • One of the most important things that founders need to think about and understand is the fact that investors, generally, need founders to go after large markets. If the market you’re targeting is Rs. 500 Crore and it’s not growing rapidly, then opportunity isn’t large enough to go for venture funding. Even if your business winds up controlling 80-90% of a Rs. 500 Cr market, the market is still too small and wouldn’t yield a large enough return for the VC. For example, after dilution, if the investor winds up holding 10% of your company, in the best case, it would probably not be worth more than Rs. 100 Crore. Something like this would make a great lifestyle business, however. So think about your market carefully before deciding to raise venture funding.

  • Ideas Vs. Products with Traction

  • Ideas are a dime a dozen. They don’t matter. What matters is execution and traction. If you’re looking for funding at the idea stage, you had better have strong successes in the past. Most investors (VCs and angels) won’t invest in ideas. They want to see that you’ve built something and that you have some measurable traction and possibly, some defensible intellectual property that’s worth something. If you have a revenue stream, even a small one, already in place, it adds significantly to your chances of getting investors interested.

    If you’re at the idea stage, talk to as many people as will listen about your idea and get feedback. Learn as much as you possibly can during this time and don’t worry about someone stealing your idea. Chances are, people have thought of similar ideas, they just haven’t done anything with their ideas. Don’t be that guy. Go build your idea.

  • Investments in Your Vertical

  • It’s important that you spend time understanding if the VC you’re approaching has done investments in your vertical. For example, e-commerce is a very broad vertical. It may be sufficient to determine that VC X has invested in e-commerce companies in the past hence, your e-commerce business selling gourmet chocolate online fits in to their investment thesis. However, to be really prepared before approaching them, you may want to research if they have invested in online food ordering or other food and beverage related businesses before. It can only help if they have.

  • Investments at Your Stage

  • Making sure there is a fit in the life cycle of your startup and what VC X typically invests in is critical. For example, if you just launched your prototype, have 1000 users on board and are looking to raise 50 lakhs in funding, you probably shouldn’t approach a VC who does much later stage and larger deals. At your stage, you are probably better off approaching an accelerator program.

    At the same though, you shouldn’t shy away from connecting with and building relationships with investors that may be a better fit for later stages in the lifecycle of your startup. Everyone is busy so don’t despair if an investor declines to “have coffee” with you. Keep trying.

  • Get a Refferal

  • I can’t stress this enough and I’m sure you’ve heard and read about this multiple times. Read it again. Get a referral to the VC(s) that you’re targeting. What does this mean? Well, it means that you need to start thinking very early on about some of the VCs that you want to approach. Find out who do you know that knows them – founders, mentors and/or advisors in some of their portfolio companies, angel investors that co-invest with them, etc. Start building relationships with these folks early on. Don’t expect to meet someone once or twice and ask them to make an introduction to a busy VC. It doesn’t work like that. If you ask someone for a premature introduction, you will most likely turn that person off and they may be unwilling to help you in the future.

  • Your Pitch Deck

  • Assume all of the other items above have worked out well and you’re ready to start connecting with the VCs in your pipeline. Sending an email detailing what your business is and who your team is, etc. is not a good way to start the relationship. Remember, you’re not the only person the VC is speaking/meeting with. Most VCs are extremely strapped for time. After getting the introduction, send over a deck with some very simple but impactful slides. If you’re going to send over 20 or 30 slides, don’t expect it to get even a glance. Start with Guy Kawasaki’s 10/20/30 Rule and after that, take a look at The Triple Play of Presenting and Dave McClure’s 10 tips for the perfect investment pitch.

    I would make a slight modification to this. If you have any traction, e.g. number of users, number of downloads, revenue, etc., then you should start the first slide with this data. If I open a deck and I see some meaningful (though early) traction, I’m more inclined to go thru the rest of the deck to see what other pleasant surprises are contained in the deck. Move the “Problem” slide to the second slot and the “Solution” slide to the third position. Move the “Team” slide to the second to last, right before the “Money” slide. Rip out the projections slide for some early investors but keep it in for other later stage investors unless you have some traction on the revenue side and can make actual projections. Most early stage projections are completely useless so let’s not event waste time on them.

  • AngelList

  • If you aren’t using AngelList, you’re losing out on an incredibly valuable resource for connecting with investors. I’ve done a few talks in New Delhi/NCR about the importance of AngelList for Indian startups and I think many Indian founders are beginning to see the importance. Though it’s a chicken and the egg problem with regards to Indian founders and Indian investors on AngelList, the one thing that you can be certain of, is that many many US investors are on AngelList and they are watching India closely. The boundaries and borders are coming down. More and more US based investors are getting active in India (we’re one of them) and AngelList gives you a direct line to them. Long story short, before contacting an investor, make sure you have a properly filled out AngelList profile ready to go. Include your AngelList profile, Twitter and Facebook in investor communications. It helps them to get to know you and see what’s happening.

So what do you think about these tips? Any more to add?

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Advice India Startups

11 Tips on Pitching an Investor, Mentor, etc.

Over the last few months, I’ve Been hearing lots of pitches from entrepreneurs. Before going on, I want to say, congrats to all of you on taking the leap towards building your businesses.

That being said, I want to tell you that most of your pitches suck! 75% of the time I want to go to sleep after the first 3 minutes. I guess it’s not your fault (the education system in India never really teaches public speaking). Do the research. It can only help you. Don’t “read Facebook” (I had to put that in. A lovely quote from an entrepreneur I recently met.)! Go read some incredible posts by people like Mark Suster, Dave McClure, Eric Ries, Brad Feld, Fred Wilson, etc.

I’m no pitch expert but here are a few pointers from what I’ve learned over the years.

  1. Do some research on the person/people you are pitching to and understand, as best as you can, their perspective BEFORE walking into pitch them.
  2. Start with the problem. In two to three sentences, explain what is the problem. If you can’t do it in three sentences, stretch it to five but get the problem across in e first thirty to sixty seconds. If you can’t hook the other party and help her identify with the problem in sixty seconds, you will lose them for the rest of the meeting. Check out this post by Dave McClure
  3. In another sixty seconds, explain your solution. Don’t take five minutes to do this. Sixty seconds to ninety seconds is the most time you should take to explain your solution.
  4. Don’t make up jargon that doesn’t fit with the industry vertical you are talking about. For example, I had two entrepreneurs working in the travel space talking about products and content and I’m thinking souvenirs and TripAdvisor. They were actually talking about customized city tours and concierge services. That was ten minutes of my life that I was never getting back. Stick to terms people identify with your industry. It makes it easier for people to follow along.
  5. Practice! Practice! Practice! Record yourself pitching on a video camera or webcam and watch it over and over. Critique yourself objectively and repeat. Share it with friends or family and see if they ‘get it’. Got to startup events like Startup Weekend where you can do 60 second pitches as well as long form demos and presentations.
  6. Refine your pitch every time you do it. Don’t stick to what you always do. If you have done 1), then you should be able to do your pitch in a way that resonates with your audience
  7. If the person you are pitching starts asking questions, that’s a good thing. You want them to interrupt you and be engaged. This means they are interested and/or trying to help. Don’t try to get thru the rest of your mental pitch in a specific order. Engage them in a discussion about the problem and your solution. (Check out Dave McClure’s talk ‘How to Pitch a VC’ from Startup Weekend Delhi)
  8. Be prepared to pitch without a deck. If you have one, pull it out but a demo is far more interesting if you really need to show something.
  9. Show passion! I find this incredibly important. Most of the entrepreneurs I come across in India may be passionate, but they don’t show it. Speak with conviction and show your passion about your idea, your business, and your team. Emotions can work in your favor if you do it right.
  10. Be open-minded. I may not know as much about your industry as you do but if you asked to meet, consider my suggestions with an open-mind. I may surprise you 🙂
  11. Don’t pretend to know what you don’t know. It makes you look more foolish than if you honestly say you have no idea what I’m talking about. You won’t believe how many times people pretend to know and follow Eric Ries‘ Lean Startup methodology but really know nothing more than buzzwords. If you don’t know something, it will show so don’t pretend.

Check out these additional resources:

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Five-ish Team Building Pitfalls Faced By Startups in India

Picture by Carbon Tippy ToesSome rights reserved

Building a team under the best of circumstances is difficult at best. As technology entrepreneurs, we will look for co-founders or senior management team members that have experience in engineering, sales/marketing, biz dev, management, fund raising and so the list goes on. In places like New York or Silicon Valley or London, it’s a bit easier to connect with the appropriate people and convince them to join your crazy idea.

Management/Co-Founding Team

In India, specifically, New Delhi, it’s a completely different ballgame. Though the word “startup” has become en vogue for college grads and those early in their careers, it’s still not something that more experienced people are comfortable with. Cities like Pune or Bangalore may be a bit different but it is rare to find someone at a startup that has 10 or 15+ years of sales experience, for example. Out of all the startups that I have come across in Delhi, I can only think of one startup that had a solid co-founding team out of the door and was also hiring senior sales, engineering, and operations folks very soon after starting up.

Finding an experienced team for a startup is very difficult, mostly because successful fist timers either continue on with their venture for various reasons, they cash out and join a VC firm or they disappear for a few years on an extended vacation. Very few of them become serial entrepreneurs and not many of them take on mentoring first time entrepreneurs.

Already having a network of entrepreneurial folks is the ideal situation but since that’s not necessarily the case for those of us not living in India, you can also try a recruiter to help you find an experienced management team, though, recruiters weren’t very useful for me when trying to put together my co-founding team.

I would suggest using personal and professional networks, organizations such as TiE, HeadStart, and Proto to start building a network of potential co-founders and senior employees well before you’ve made the decision to startup in India. If you’re not in India, I would strongly advise creating a budget for traveling to India a few times prior to moving to spend time and meet with some of the people you’ve identified as potential co-founders/senior team members.

Obsession with Entrepreneurship

India truly is a land of entrepreneurs. Everyone ranging from the corner grocery “thela” or pushcart, to the founders of Reliance and Tata are entrepreneurs. What this means in the context of startup team building is that it’s very hard to find good people who want a job a for very long. Generally speaking, competent people in India are perpetually trying to figure out how they can go off on their own and be their own boss. Many times they will get a partner like a friend or relative but rarely will they join a startup where they aren’t at the top of the pyramid.

There are plenty of engineers, sales/marketing people that start up a business of their own on a daily basis, most typically a service oriented business because of the low capital requirements.

One of the ways you can use this entrepreneurial desire in Indians to build your own startup team is to seek out those you want to start their own business. Nurture them, mentor them, and give them equity in your business as well as look at the possibility of funding/incubating their business ideas. Though they may not be ready to be co-founders in your venture, they very well could be superstars in your startup and when the time is right, they may even be your first angel investment.

Being a No Name

Another stumbling block to hiring a strong team is the Indian obsession with brand names. Indian families place a great deal of stress on their kids to go work for a large brand name company. In technology, this means college grads looking for jobs at a foreign multinational corporations (“MNCs”) like Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, Nokia, Motorola, etc. or one of the Indian multinationals like Wipro, TCS, Infosys, HCL, etc. (referred to as The Axis of Evil by Vishal Gondal of IndiaGames). Startups obviously haven’t developed a brand name so recruiting good talent in India is much harder.

Because of the emphasis on brand names in India, what happens is that most of the great talent gets sucked up by the big MNCs and large Indian MNCs who hire 20,000+ engineers yearly. What’s left over goes to the second and third tier tech companies. Finally, whoever didn’t get a job anywhere else submits their resume to more or less every job opening on Monster India, Naukri, etc.

However, there’s no reason you can’t build a brand with a little bit of money and some time. Build your brand by blogging, engaging with people on Twitter and contributing useful, insightful comments in the appropriate Linkedin groups. You’ve all heard this stuff so let’s move onto the fun stuff. Give your time to an entrepreneurial organization like TiE, HeadStart or Proto. Organize events, speak at events, create presentations and if possible, get some press coverage. Traditional media in India still has the breadth and depth of distribution that new media hasn’t been able to achieve yet. Organize and hold BarCamps or similar unconferences and promote yourself and your startup accordingly. You probably won’t be able to build a nationwide household brand name in a few months or a year but you will be able to build a localized brand name for your target audience, potential co-founders and employees with an entrepreneurial bent for your startup.

You can also use the Indian job sites mentioned above but you’ll be buried under a deluge of resumes. Good luck sifting and sorting those few hundred resumes to find the diamond in the rough. It happens but the odds are totally against you finding a star amongst the flood of resumes you’ve received.

If you can find a decent head hunter (“Recruiting Consultant”) that is willing to work with a startup, then I highly recommend using one. They will sort thru the resumes for you and instead of getting two hundred resumes, you may get fifty. The other benefit to using a good recruiter is that they will make sure the candidate actually shows up for the interview.

Dealing with Recruiters

Recruiters will typically take a month’s salary for “freshers” or mid-level candidates and they can take up to twenty percent of the total package for a senior candidate. Everything is negotiable so don’t hesitate in negotiating these fees. One recruiter I worked with started with sixteen percent of the total package or CTC (“Cost to Company”) paid within one month of the person being hired and they finally settled on one month’s salary being paid every quarter over the first year of the candidate’s employment. Recruiters are notorious for placing a person and then recruiting them for another job within three months. This was my insurance policy against the recruiter farming my employees, at least for the first year of their employment.

The flip side to working out a deal so favorable to you is that many recruiters will weigh the opportunity cost of working with you under conditions like this and as the market picks up, they will instead focus on the companies that will give the recruiter more favorable terms like full payment within thirty days of the candidate being hired. If you’re doing a high volume of hires this problem can be mitigated. Unfortunately most startups don’t hire twenty or thirty people in their first year in India unless their a service company and have positive cash flow very quickly.

Miscellaneous Pitfalls

“I’m two hours late to the interview because of traffic”

I’ve had quite a few candidates either show up more than two hours late for an interview or not show up at all. Traffic being the most often used excuse. The truth is, Indians don’t really respect time and this shows in all aspects of day to day life. Don’t take it personally. It happens more often than not so it’s nothing about you or your startup. Forget about it and move onto the next one. One thing that may make you feel like you’re not wasting your time is to schedule two or three candidates to come in at the same time and interview them on a first come, first serve basis. I wouldn’t dream of doing this in the US but in India, it’s the most productive and completely acceptable way of working.

The Employee’s Blank Stare

I had hired a designer who talked the talk really well. I’m not a designer but he sounded good. I hired him and he started work on a Monday. Wednesday morning, his mother called in sick for him. The following Monday, I had to fire him for spending too much time on IM with his wife, looking for another job while sitting two feet away from me and also downloading other people’s designs and logos off the web and passing them on as his own ideas. In the hour and a half “discussion” we had, rather than apologizing for the things he was blatantly doing wrong, all I got was the blank stare. It was my first experience with this sort of thing. Had I gotten a “I’m sorry about that and my problem is …..”, I probably would have given him another chance, while keeping a very close eye on him. I’m still not quite sure what the blank stare is for but in hindsight, I’m assuming it’s an apology without admission of guilt. Much like most settlements with the SEC.

Asides

Design, image, graphic theft is a very common issue in India. Many “designers” are really just PhotoShop jocks taking other people’s work so keep an eye out for this and encourage fresh ideas.

Many new developers suffer from the copy and paste syndrome so try to encourage them to write their own code hence, developing their skills as programmers, and limiting any sort of legal and other liabilities.

Firing people in India isn’t so clean cut so, I’d advise you to look into some of the laws related to Hiring and Firing in India.

“I want my own startup but I don’t want your stinkin’ Equity”

Conserving cash and giving options or equity to employees in India can be tough. Very few 20-somethings will opt for more options than cash. The reason is pretty simple. A check every month going into their bank account that they can show to their parents, grandparents, extended family, significant others and potential marriage proposals goes a lot further than showing off a share certificate. Budget for paying salaries instead of very low salaries and some equity options (“ESOPS”). You may wind up giving the employee some options later on, if they stick around for some time or if you sell the company or go public but for various sociological reasons, “cash is king” so save the equity for those who really value it.

I would love to hear some of your stories and comments. What do you think? Drop in a comment below with your thoughts.

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Seven Steps to Starting a Company in India

Picture Copyright of claudiogennari

This is part I in a series of posts about issues faced by Teknatus Solutions Private Limited in India from 2007 – 2010. Being the first part, I’m going to look at the steps needed to get a business registered in India. I’ll examine the case of a foreign national/foreign company looking to setup an Indian subsidiary.

Rules in India for registering a company a quite onerous and time consuming. However, shutting down a company is even more difficult so make sure you need to register a Private Limited company or a LLP before going down this road.

Disclaimer: This is not legal or financial advice. Consider this nothing more than an explanation of what I did, and why I did it this way.

Find a Recommended Chartered Accountant (CA) and Lawyer

As with any country, when starting a business, it’s advisable to have a good accountant and lawyer working with you. In India, CAs provide a great deal of legal advice as well as accounting advice. I suggest finding a CA and lawyer in your city that is recommended by someone you know and trust. It took me some time to find a good one that fit into my budget but when I did, his firm took a great deal of burden off me in setting up the company and dealing with the various bureaucracies.

Apply for a PAN (Permanent Account Number) Card

The first thing required to do anything in India is to get a PAN Card if you don’t already have one. If you’re a foreigner or NRI, you probably don’t have one. If you’re a foreigner or NRI moving to India, apply for a PAN Card as soon as possible. The Indian government recently announced that they will begin accepting PAN card applications at embassies and consulates so please check with your local consulate/embassy first. If you’re in India already, the best thing would be to call the IT (Income Tax) Department Hotline and ask them where the closest PAN card processing center for foreigners and NRIs is. Some centers, do not accept applications from foreigners or NRIs. If you’ve already found a good CA or lawyer then they can probably take care of this for you. However, I found that Chartered Accountants, Agents, and Brokers in India were not very effective in obtaining a PAN Card for foreign nationals, though, they were always very confident that they could get it done quickly and easily. Instead, calling the IT Hotline and going in person to apply can be much cheaper and quicker.

  1. Call the IT Hotline for the closest processing center
  2. Go to the processing center with 2 passport photographs (Indian size passport photos, not US size passport photos), a proof of address such as an MTNL/BSNL phone bill, bank statement, or passport copy with your address on it.
  3. Submit the application and if all is in order, you should have your PAN card within a week.

Apply for a DIN (Director Identification Number)

A DIN is required for any and all Director’s of an Indian company. The DIN number is used by a Director for various government and official correspondence as well as opening up bank accounts, etc. As soon as you receive your PAN Card, you should apply for a DIN if you are going to be a Director of the company.

  1. Apply for a provisional DIN
  2. Pay the DIN application fee as described
  3. Print out and mail in the DIN Application within 60 days of applying for the provisional DIN. It should be noted here that foreign nationals will need to provide a copy of their passport with the application. The passport will need to be notarized by the local Indian Embassy or Consulate. Before they will notarize the passport, you will also need an apostile from your local city or state government. If you already in India, you will need to go to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs or the local FRO office and have them notarize your passport copy before it can be submitted. If you get the passport notarized by your country’s embassy, you have a 50% chance of being rejected and you’ll need to apply again.

Apply for a DSC (Digital Signature Certificate)

The Indian Ministry of Corporate Affairs has a pretty good explanation of how to obtain the DSC and the approved issuers or certificate authorities from whom you may obtain a digital certificate.

Apply for a Company

This step is probably one of the more complicated ones and I do suggest having your CA handle this step. I found that having my CA get the DIN, DSC, and submit the application of incorporation to the RoC (Registrar of Companies) was fairly cost effective and saved me a great deal of time and aggravation. However, if you choose to go ahead and do it yourself, you should look into the MCA offices in your area and follow the steps necessary to form a Private Limited company in India.

In either case, you must do the following:

  1. Find four possible names, in order of preference, that you would like to use for your company. The company names cannot be in use already and the company name must end in “Private Limited” for a privately held company.
  2. Once a name has been approved by the RoC, submit the Memorandum of Association and Articles of Association. These two documents are critical and for the most part, they are fairly standardized. Your CA will provide these to you for filling in the blanks and then submit them to the RoC on your behalf. Your CA will also guide you in what other supporting documents are necessary.
  3. If everything is in order, you will receive the Certificate of Incorporation

Apply for a Company PAN Card

Once you receive the Certificate of Incorporation, you will need to apply for a company PAN Card. You will not be able to open up a company bank account without a company PAN Card. Typically, you can apply at the place where you submitted the application for your personal PAN Card or your CA/lawyer can usually handle this for you.

Apply for a Company TAN (Tax Account Number)

The TAN will be used for collecting or depositing tax deducted at source (TDS). Like most forms in India, you can fill out the form online, print it out and send in a hardcopy. A list of processing centers can be found here. Consider having your CA or lawyer handle this along with the company PAN card.

The steps I’ve outlined here are pretty general and one thing to note is that the rules and requirements for many things in India change depending on who you speak to you or who’s got your file on their desk. For example, my DIN application was rejected because my passport copy was notarized by the embassy and NOT the Indian consulate or the Indian FRO office. However, the other Director’s DIN applications was successfully processed. Hence, you should know the requirements and know the process but it makes life much easier if you have a trusted resource to handle the bureaucracy for you. If you’re having trouble finding a lawyer or CA in India to handle things for you, post a comment and hopefully, we can get you the right person.

Resources

  1. Ministry of Corporate Affairs
  2. Director Identification Number
  3. Digital Subscriber Certificate
  4. DSC Issuers
  5. MCA Steps to Incorporation
  6. Indian Income Tax Department
  7. DoingBusiness.Org

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Namaste India

Namaste India - Taj Mahal
Picture Copyright of Pankaj Jain

In early 2007, we made a commitment to open our office in New Delhi, India and begin building a platform to help connect India’s unskilled labor force with the Indian middle and upper class that had a requirement for unskilled labor like nannies, cooks, maids, drivers and other domestic services. We finally opened our office in January 2008, cutting through lots of red tape, hiring and firing a few unproductive legal and accounting “consultants”, borrowing office space and hiring a few college students as interns.

Some of the ups and downs that Teknatus faced have been documented on the Teknatus blog. However, the blog has been fairly silent for quite some time. I’ve finally been able to look back in a rear view mirror and talk about the journey, that eventually led to the closing of Teknatus’ New Delhi office, and my return to New York City.

This is the intro in a series of posts I’ll be doing on Teknatus’ journey in India and my decision to ultimately shut down Teknatus Solutions Private Limited. I hope other entrepreneurs in India and those considering a move to India get some valuable information from thus series of posts.

Stay tuned for Part I.

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