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Angel Investing Business Entrepreneurship Investing InvestStream Video Startups Venture Capital

What is the Difference Between Venture Capitalists and Angel Investors?

What is the difference between venture capitalists and angel investors? In this episode of InvestStream, I discuss the difference between these two types of startup investors. Knowing the difference can be very useful in understanding a particular investor’s motivation for investing or not investing in a startup.

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Watch the equity dilution in your startup!

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Raising money for a startup has become a default option for most founders. Very few even consider bootstrapping anymore. That’s neither a good or bad thing and not the point of this post.

Unfortunately, not as many founders or investors discuss equity dilution as much as they should. Too many startups give up too much equity in their startup before their series A and I often see good companies struggling to raise a series A because of too much dilution early on.

What do you think is a reasonable amount of dilution going into a Series A and after closing a Series A?

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Angel Investing Business Entrepreneurship Investing InvestStream Video Startups Venture Capital

A New Livestream Series – The Raise

As founders, a VC, angel and, now, through our advisory business at Founder Craft, we get asked for advice or “feedback” a lot. The questions range across a wide spectrum. However, they have one thing in common – they as for our opinions.

My Partner at Founder Craft, Gregarious and I have been doing some live streams over the last few months in addition to my InvestStream videos on YouTube and Instagram.

A little over a month ago, I was in Oman for an Investment Committee meeting and Greg messaged me. He said he was thinking about raising money for his new startup, Fanabulous! and what did I think about streaming the process.

I thought it was a great idea. Doing each episode, completely unscripted, focusing on him as a founder preparing to raise money for his new startup, should resonate with founders and even with some investors.

After some fine tuning, we launched ‘The Raise‘, an interactive, live-stream where Gregarious (the Founder) and I (the Investor) dive into the process of his fundraise.

You can subscribe to the YouTube channel to receive notifications of every episode. If you have questions, feel free to throw them up in the comments or drop us an email at raise@foundercraft.com

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Advice Angel Investing Business Entrepreneurship Startups Venture Capital

A Little Pitch Advice (Playlist)

Are you a co-founder of a startup? Are you thinking of raising money? Have you already raised money and are navigating the relationship with your new investors? Are you trying to figure out where to start with your pitch deck?

I’ve made a playlist answering these questions and some more. Over time, I will continue to add more InvestStream videos to the playlist specifically for startups that are pitching. I hope you find it helpful.

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What makes a startup venture fundable?

There are a multitude of things that help make #startups attractive to #angel #investors & #venturecapitalists. In this video, I shared 3 things that I think are critical to a startup being venture fundable.

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There are a few things that should be on the checklist of any startup before they think of approaching investors other than friends and family.

  1. The first is TAM or “Total Addressable Market”. VCs need big markets to support big companies. A better understanding of VC economics would help explain this a bit better but for the moment, just assume that VCs need big exits otherwise they go out of business. Big exits are usually via IPOs. Rarely does the NYSE or Nasdaq allow listing a company under a $1 billion market cap. In order for a company to list for on a public exchange for a billion dollars, they really need a few hundred million in revenue and lots of growth prospects otherwise, public investors won’t buy into the IPO. After years of rapidly increasing valuations in the space, we’re starting to see some strain in the ride-sharing space after Lyft and Uber’s IPOs. Even Slack has struggled after going public. Unless the market that a startup is targeting is a multi-billion dollar market or growing rapidly, it’s very difficult to convince most VCs to invest.
  2. The quality of the team is critical to the success of a startup and its execution. If the team is solid, investors are more likely to get excited about investing.
  3. Finally, there’s traction. Having traction is critical to an early stage startup looking attractive to angels and VCs. If the traction is strong and there’s a well understood growth plan, investors are more confident that the team can attack the large total addressable market.

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